Weekly Summaries

Brain Gut Connection

Gut–Microbiota–Brain Interaction?- Issue # 88/1

posted by: Joe Vargas Monday 12/09/2013

 

Probiotics: Gut-Brain Interaction

There are people who call the gut the “second brain”, and that may be where the term having “a gut feeling” about something originates from. It has been shown that your gut health has an effect on your brain health and on your mental state. It has also been shown that depression can be alleviated with an improved gut micro-flora through the use of probiotics. This week we wanted to share some amazing information about ASD (Autism spectrum disorder) sufferers and the fact that many of them also suffer from GI (Gastrointestinal) issues. We can also see the effect of probiotics on this group of people. This information comes to us from the good people at Caltech.edu, read on to learn about this  gut–microbiota–brain interaction :

 

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is diagnosed when individuals exhibit characteristic behaviors that include repetitive actions, decreased social interactions, and impaired communication. Curiously, many individuals with ASD also suffer from gastrointestinal (GI) issues, such as abdominal cramps and constipation.

Using the co-occurrence of brain and gut problems in ASD as their guide, researchers at the California Institute Technology (Caltech) are investigating a potentially transformative new therapy for autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

The gut microbiota—the community of bacteria that populate the human GI tract—previously has been shown to influence social and emotional behavior, but the Caltech research, published online in the December 5 issue of the journal Cell, is the first to demonstrate that changes in these gut bacteria can influence autism-like behaviors in a mouse model.

“Traditional research has studied autism as a genetic disorder and a disorder of the brain, but our work shows that gut bacteria may contribute to ASD-like symptoms in ways that were previously unappreciated,” says Professor of Biology Sarkis K. Mazmanian. “Gut physiology appears to have effects on what are currently presumed to be brain functions.”

To study this gut–microbiota–brain interaction, the researchers used a mouse model of autism previously developed at Caltech in the laboratory of Paul H. Patterson, the Anne P. and Benjamin F. Biaggini Professor of Biological Sciences. In humans, having a severe viral infection raises the risk that a pregnant woman will give birth to a child with autism. Patterson and his lab reproduced the effect in mice using a viral mimic that triggers an infection-like immune response in the mother and produces the core behavioral symptoms associated with autism in the offspring.

In the new Cell study, Mazmanian, Patterson, and their colleagues found that the “autistic” offspring of immune-activated pregnant mice also exhibited GI abnormalities. In particular, the GI tracts of autistic-like mice were “leaky,” which means that they allow material to pass through the intestinal wall and into the bloodstream. This characteristic, known as intestinal permeability, has been reported in some autistic individuals. “To our knowledge, this is the first report of an animal model for autism with comorbid GI dysfunction,” says Elaine Hsiao, a senior research fellow at Caltech and the first author on the study.

To see whether these GI symptoms actually influenced the autism-like behaviors, the researchers treated the mice with Bacteroides fragilis, a bacterium that has been used as an experimental probiotic therapy in animal models of GI disorders.

The result? The leaky gut was corrected.

In addition, observations of the treated mice showed that their behavior had changed. In particular, they were more likely to communicate with other mice, had reduced anxiety, and were less likely to engage in a repetitive digging behavior.

“The B. fragilis treatment alleviates GI problems in the mouse model and also improves some of the main behavioral symptoms,” Hsiao says. “This suggests that GI problems could contribute to particular symptoms in neurodevelopmental disorders.”

With the help of clinical collaborators, the researchers are now planning a trial to test the probiotic treatment on the behavioral symptoms of human autism. The trial should begin within the next year or two, says Patterson.

“This probiotic treatment is postnatal, which means that the mother has already experienced the immune challenge, and, as a result, the growing fetuses have already started down a different developmental path,” Patterson says. “In this study, we can provide a treatment after the offspring have been born that can help improve certain behaviors. I think that’s a powerful part of the story.”

The researchers stress that much work is still needed to develop an effective and reliable probiotic therapy for human autism—in part because there are both genetic and environmental contributions to the disorder, and because the immune-challenged mother in the mouse model reproduces only the environmental component.

“I think our results may someday transform the way people view possible causes and potential treatments for autism,” Mazmanian says.

 

RECOMMENDATION

To read the entire article click - here . As the studies pile up on the benefits of having a healthy gut microflora ecosystem in our bodies, it is clear that taking the steps to ensure we have a thriving community of “good” bacteria in our gut is crucial for not only our digestive system but for our brain and mental health. While more studies are being conducted and more information comes in on all the different benefits of probiotics in our body, it is becoming a “no brainer” (pun intended) to supplement our intake of probiotics.

 

 

THANK YOU!

The FruitsMax family members would like to give thanks to all our new Amazon.com customers, we could never ever express exactly how delighted we are to have you as part of our family. If you have not joined us yet and would like to learn more click – probiotics.

 

Author: Joe Vargas

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